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Church Strategy

Tools and Trends for Strategic Planning

Monthly Archives: February 2010

According to the Census Bureau, Americans are spending more time commuting than ever and solo commuters are outpacing growth in mass transit.  What’s it mean for your church?

Consider Josh, a young dad whose wife is home with their young child.  Josh’s commuting options on a normal Wednesday are:
(a) suffer through the longer commute, or
(b) work late to avoid traffic.

Either way, he’s now spending less time doing things that contribute to the life of the church, like connecting with others from church, exercising hospitality, spending time with his family, or getting involved in church-related activities.

This sounds like awful news.  But let’s take a moment to brainstorm the options for your church:
   1. Get your sermon podcast going so that commuters can podcast it.
   2. Consider a podcast or MP3 that recaps highlights from the prior weekend’s service, previews the upcoming weekend, and touches on key activities in the church.
   3. What about 15-minute virtual Bible studies, where people can dial in to a conference line to discuss a passage together as they’re commuting?
   4. Why not get your congregants together for coffees/lunches in the areas where they work?  Many of your people may not even know that they work near one another.
   5. What about lunch-hour dial-in small groups for people whose commuting keeps them from joining your other small groups?
   6. Could you get the families of extreme commuters together for weekly dinners to create some community even as the commuters are at work.
   7. What about providing prayer lists for commuters each week?  What would God do in your church with an army of mobile prayer warriors talking to Him about your church each week?

These are just a few ideas.  Keep your eye on megatrends — like extreme commuting — and spot the opportunities to engage your people in new ways.

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According to the Census Bureau, Americans are spending more time commuting than ever and solo commuters are outpacing growth in mass transit.  What’s it mean for your church?

Consider Josh, a young dad whose wife is home with their young child.  Josh’s commuting options on a normal Wednesday are:
(a) suffer through the longer commute, or
(b) work late to avoid traffic.

Either way, he’s now spending less time doing things that contribute to the life of the church, like connecting with others from church, exercising hospitality, spending time with his family, or getting involved in church-related activities.

This sounds like awful news.  But let’s take a moment to brainstorm the options for your church:
   1. Get your sermon podcast going so that commuters can podcast it.
   2. Consider a podcast or MP3 that recaps highlights from the prior weekend’s service, previews the upcoming weekend, and touches on key activities in the church.
   3. What about 15-minute virtual Bible studies, where people can dial in to a conference line to discuss a passage together as they’re commuting?
   4. Why not get your congregants together for coffees/lunches in the areas where they work?  Many of your people may not even know that they work near one another.
   5. What about lunch-hour dial-in small groups for people whose commuting keeps them from joining your other small groups?
   6. Could you get the families of extreme commuters together for weekly dinners to create some community even as the commuters are at work.
   7. What about providing prayer lists for commuters each week?  What would God do in your church with an army of mobile prayer warriors talking to Him about your church each week?

These are just a few ideas.  Keep your eye on megatrends — like extreme commuting — and spot the opportunities to engage your people in new ways.

Tags: ,